Our program is subject to change. Speakers have confirmed their intent to participate; however, scheduling conflicts may arise.

SPEAKERS:

Bonnie Glaser, M.A.

Steven Lee Myers

Susan Shirk, Ph.D.

Sheila Smith, Ph.D.

Bonnie S. Glaser is a senior adviser for Asia and the director of the China Power Project at CSIS, where she works on issues related to Asia-Pacific security with a focus on Chinese foreign and security policy. She is concomitantly a nonresident fellow with the Lowy Institute in Sydney, Australia, and a senior associate with the CSIS Pacific Forum. Ms. Glaser has worked for more than three decades at the intersection of Asia-Pacific geopolitics and U.S. policy. From 2008 to mid-2015, she was a senior adviser with the CSIS Freeman Chair in China Studies, and from 2003 to 2008, she was a senior associate in the CSIS International Security Program. Prior to joining CSIS, she served as a consultant for various U.S. government offices, including the Departments of Defense and State. Ms. Glaser has published widely in academic and policy journals, including the Washington Quarterly, China Quarterly, Asian Survey, International Security, Contemporary Southeast Asia, American Foreign Policy Interests, Far Eastern Economic Review, and Korean Journal of Defense Analysis, as well as in leading newspapers such as the New York Times and International Herald Tribune and in various edited volumes on Asian security. She is also a regular contributor to the Pacific Forum web journal Comparative Connections. She is currently a board member of the U.S. Committee of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific and a member of both the Council on Foreign Relations and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. She served as a member of the Defense Department’s Defense Policy Board China Panel in 1997. Ms. Glaser received her B.A. in Political Science from Boston University and her M.A. with concentrations in international economics and Chinese Studies from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.
 

Steven Lee Myers is a veteran diplomatic and national security correspondent, now based in the Beijing bureau of The Times. In 2013 and 2014 he worked as The Times Moscow bureau chief. He previously served as a correspondent and bureau chief there from 2002 to 2007, covering Russia and the other former Soviet republics. He is the author of the biography of Vladimir Putin, entitled The New Tsar: The Rise and Reign of Vladimir Putin, published by Alfred A. Knopf Books in September 2015.

Mr. Myers began his career at The Times in 1989 and worked in New York City until moving to Washington in 1996, where he covered first the State Department and then the Pentagon through the aftermath of the attacks of September 11, 2001.

He has reported on conflicts in Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Chechnya and Iraq. In 2003, he was “embedded” with the Army’s Third Infantry Division during the invasion of Iraq and reported extensively on the division’s experience there and back home that year. He returned to Iraq as a correspondent and bureau chief from 2009 to 2011.

In Washington, he also covered the White House during the presidency of George W. Bush and has written on the State Department during the tenures now of five different Secretaries of State, most recently Hillary Rodham Clinton and John Kerry.

Born in Los Angeles in 1965, Mr. Myers received a bachelor’s degree in rhetoric from the University of California at Berkeley, graduating with honors in 1987. As a Rotary International scholar, he received a master’s degree, with distinction, in literature and art history from the University of Reading, Reading, England in 1989.
 

Susan Shirk, Ph.D. Susan Shirk is the Chair of the 21st Century China Center and Research Professor at the School of Global Policy and Strategy at the University of California - San Diego. She is also director emeritus of the University of California’s Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation (IGCC). Susan Shirk first visited China in 1971 and has been teaching, researching, and engaging China diplomatically ever since.

From 1997–2000, Shirk served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the Bureau of East Asia and Pacific Affairs, with responsibility for China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Mongolia.

In 1993, she founded, and continues to lead, the Northeast Asia Cooperation Dialogue (NEACD), a Track 1.5 forum for discussions of security issues among defense and foreign ministry officials and academics from the U.S., Japan, China, Russia, South Korea and North Korea.

Shirk’s publications include her books, China: Fragile Superpower; How China Opened Its Door: The Political Success of the PRC’s Foreign Trade and Investment Reforms; The Political Logic of Economic Reform in China; Competitive Comrades: Career Incentives and Student Strategies in China; and her edited book, Changing Media, Changing China.

She co-chaired a task force of China experts, “US Policy Toward China: Recommendations for a New Administration,” that issued its report in February 2017.

In 2015, the UC-San Diego chancellor awarded Susan Shirk the Revelle Medal for extraordinary service to the campus. The Girl Scouts named her one of San Diego’s “Cool Women” in 2016.

Dr. Shirk received her B.A. in Political Science from Mount Holyoke College, her M.A. in Asian Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and her Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
 

Sheila A. Smith, Ph.D., an expert on Japanese politics and foreign policy, is senior fellow for Japan studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). She is the author of Intimate Rivals: Japanese Domestic Politics and a Rising China (Columbia University Press, 2015) and Japan’s New Politics and the U.S.-Japan Alliance (Council on Foreign Relations, June 2014). Her current research focuses on how geostrategic change in Asia is shaping Japan’s strategic choices. In the fall of 2014, Smith began a project on Northeast Asian Nationalisms and Alliance Management.

Smith is a regular contributor to the CFR blog Asia Unbound, and frequent contributor to major media outlets in the United States and Asia. She joined CFR from the East-West Center in 2007, where she directed a multinational research team in a cross-national study of the domestic politics of the U.S. military presence in Japan, South Korea, and the Philippines. She was a visiting scholar at Keio University in 2007-08, where she researched Japan’s foreign policy towards China, supported by the Abe Fellowship. Smith has been a visiting researcher at two leading Japanese foreign and security policy think tanks, the Japan Institute of International Affairs and the Research Institute for Peace and Security, and at the University of Tokyo and the University of the Ryukyus.

Dr. Smith is vice chair of the U.S. advisors to the U.S.-Japan Conference on Cultural and Educational Exchange (CULCON), a bi-national advisory panel of government officials and private sector members. She also serves on the advisory committee for the U.S.-Japan Network for the Future program of the Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation. She teaches as an adjunct professor at the Asian Studies Department of Georgetown University and serves on the board of its Journal of Asian Affairs. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the department of political science at Columbia University.